Trailer – Green Teeth

Above is the trailer for my only narrative film this year, Green Teeth.  There has been a huge gap in my film projects recently, caused by writing a second book and having a huge chunk of time taken up with a project that fell through late last year.  Green Teeth as a project came along quite by chance when adventuring on several walks with the … Continue reading Trailer – Green Teeth

Wanders: Two Notting Hills

For some time now, I’ve been wandering around Notting Hill attempting to get under its skin.  For many years, even before I moved to London, there was something that struck me about both the level of contrasts in the area and how such contrasts were reflected in film history and locations.  Even recently, I have been engaged on a film project set around both Ladbroke … Continue reading Wanders: Two Notting Hills

Wanders: Longplayer (New Cross to Trinity Buoy Wharf)

“Witness, for instance, the establishment of settled ‘alternative’ or ‘independent’ cultural zones, which endlessly repeat older gestures of rebellion and contestation as if for the first time.” – Mark Fisher The Longplayer walk ghosts a route to be taken on the 21st of June for a day long walked festival of arts in celebration of Jem Finer’s work. Information on the Longplayer event, featuring an … Continue reading Wanders: Longplayer (New Cross to Trinity Buoy Wharf)

Wanders: Leamouth Labyrinth

Having walked down the Lea Valley late last year with Gary Budden, we endeavoured to continue on from our point of departure in Planet Stratford and to follow the river right the way down to Leamouth where it finally pours into the Thames.  Though on paper the walk was effectively a south-following meander, mapped largely (or at least so we thought) by potentially walking along … Continue reading Wanders: Leamouth Labyrinth

Wanders:Women’s March London – Walking As Dissent

On the 21st of January, over 100,000 people marched through London in solidarity with women against the hatred currently being espoused by the recently inaugurated president of the USA.  This was alongside many other marches globally, especially in America, of unprecedented numbers of people; showing their resistance against what is effectively a newly elected fascist government.  I went along on the walk, partly to support … Continue reading Wanders:Women’s March London – Walking As Dissent

Wanders: Planet Stratford with John Rogers (London).

When recently interviewing the writer and filmmaker, John Rogers, the setting of our meeting place in Stratford played heavily upon my mind.  Such was the contrast between so many of the buildings and spaces within the area that many ideas came about just from a quick meander around its many new developments.  Because of this we agreed to reconvene at the place a few weeks … Continue reading Wanders: Planet Stratford with John Rogers (London).

Responses: Keith Arnatt’s A.O.N.B (1982-1984).

The photography series, Areas Of Outstanding Natural Beauty (1982-1984), was the first work I came across by Keith Arnatt.  This was some time before he would eventually be back in vogue thanks to Tate Britain’s well received conceptual exhibition, of which his most famous work, Self Burial (1969), was the publicity image for.  Very much like the landscapes that so much of Arnatt’s work captures, … Continue reading Responses: Keith Arnatt’s A.O.N.B (1982-1984).

Wanders: Muriel Spark’s Ballad Of Peckham Rye (London).

“I shall have to do research,” Dougal mused, “into their inner lives.  Research into the real Peckham.  It will be necessary to discover the spiritual well-spring, the glorious history of the place, before I am able to offer some impetus.” (1960, p.17). To ingratiate myself into newly living in South London, I was keen to find some boundary markers in the area to walk and … Continue reading Wanders: Muriel Spark’s Ballad Of Peckham Rye (London).

Responses: Alison and Peter Smithson’s Architecture (London).

Alison and Peter Smithson are two of the most influential architects of the 20th century.  This is in spite of the fact that only several of their buildings made it past the design stage and that, of those that did in the UK at least, they have often been reviled as the most grim of Brutalist designs.  Yet, apart from their buildings standing out for … Continue reading Responses: Alison and Peter Smithson’s Architecture (London).