Responses: Derek Jarman’s Landscape Paintings

I've written extensively about Derek Jarman's short super-8 film, Journey To Avebury; one of his earliest experiments in film that channels so much of the genii loci of English landscapes, ubiquitous in the more interesting of English arts.  His walk through the Wiltshire landscape after the intense stint of work on the sets for Ken … Continue reading Responses: Derek Jarman’s Landscape Paintings

Responses: Jeremy Deller’s A Good Day For Cyclists (2013)

When Jeremy Deller took control of the UK's pavilion in the 2013 Venice Biennale, the press coverage caught hold of one specific aspect that the artist discussed; its "aggressiveness".  With environmental concern sat at the heart of the exhibition, alongside the general political upheaval caused by the coalition government during its third year of power, … Continue reading Responses: Jeremy Deller’s A Good Day For Cyclists (2013)

Sex and the Landscape in Zabriskie Point (1970) and The Last Movie (1971)

"Once I loved a man who was a lot like the desert, and before that I loved the desert." - Rebecca Solnit (2006). Late last year, I quite accidently combined the viewing of two films that spoke of a theme I have become interested in over the last few months.  Viewing Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point … Continue reading Sex and the Landscape in Zabriskie Point (1970) and The Last Movie (1971)

Wire and Grass: Landscape Binaries in Television and Reality.

At the recent Alchemical Landscape conference in Cambridge, there was some interesting analysis of the portrayal of landscape in the opening sequence of Alan Clarke's Play For Today episode, Penda's Fen (1974).  The point in the analysis was to show the subversive nature of the opening in regards to its melding of two potentially differing realities … Continue reading Wire and Grass: Landscape Binaries in Television and Reality.

Place and Youth in Margaret Tait’s A Portrait Of Ga (1952).

"My mother lives in the windy Orkney Islands.  It's certainly a wonderful place to be brought up in." - A Portrait Of Ga In making a short film about her mother, the experimental filmmaker, Margaret Tait, essentially drew upon an interesting dialectic between place and youth.  With 1952's A Portrait Of Ga - a 4 … Continue reading Place and Youth in Margaret Tait’s A Portrait Of Ga (1952).