Heart Of Glass (1976) – Optimism in Destruction

On a rock, there sits a man lost in thought.  Or perhaps he is not thinking at all and is instead letting the landscape around him fill his thoughts unconsciously.  Werner Herzog's 1976 film, Heart of Glass (Herz aus Glas), has one of the director's strongest opening set of images as the main character of … Continue reading Heart Of Glass (1976) – Optimism in Destruction

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Politics of Sequence in Code Unknown (2000, Michael Haneke)

Even before the recent events that occurred in Charlottesville, a certain scene from Michael Haneke's 2000 film, Code Unknown (Code Inconnu), had been repeatedly playing on a loop in my mind's eye.  I quietly admitted to myself recently that the scene in question is without a doubt the most telling and poignant dramatic escalation I … Continue reading Politics of Sequence in Code Unknown (2000, Michael Haneke)

Sex and the Landscape in Zabriskie Point (1970) and The Last Movie (1971)

"Once I loved a man who was a lot like the desert, and before that I loved the desert." - Rebecca Solnit (2006). Late last year, I quite accidently combined the viewing of two films that spoke of a theme I have become interested in over the last few months.  Viewing Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point … Continue reading Sex and the Landscape in Zabriskie Point (1970) and The Last Movie (1971)

Stasis In London (1994) – Patrick Keiller.

On watching all of Patrick Keiller's "Robinson" trilogy of films recently, it struck home how effectively stillness within a visual frame can traverse the geographical plain and recreate a journey that is both political and sociological.  This, of course, goes to the heart filmmaking itself, the relationships with cuts especially and its portrayal of time, … Continue reading Stasis In London (1994) – Patrick Keiller.

The Nowhere Road in The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (1972) – Luis Buñuel.

Because of their tapestry-like nature, the films of Luis Buñuel lend themselves well to a more in-depth form analysis.  Within their aesthetic ploys and their narrative spines lies a wealth of readings concerning Buñuel's attacks and treatises on politics and class especially.  His 1972, Oscar-winning film, The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie is a perfect … Continue reading The Nowhere Road in The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (1972) – Luis Buñuel.

Ghosts In The Ice: The Emigrants (W.G. Sebald) and 45 Years (Andrew Haigh).

On finishing W.G. Sebald's four quartered documentary piece, The Emigrants (1992), I felt as if a loose connection to some recent film or book was hanging midair, waiting to be tied up.  The narrative is split into the stories of four émigrés, all seemingly interconnected by a multitude of strange images but chiefly connected by … Continue reading Ghosts In The Ice: The Emigrants (W.G. Sebald) and 45 Years (Andrew Haigh).

Libidinal Circuits in 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her (1967) – Jean-Luc Godard.

Jean-Luc Godard has always had a quiet interest in the relationship between his politics and the space they inhabit.  The topographies of modernity coinciding with his political questioning of capitalism occurs in films such as Tout Va Bien (1972), La Chinoise (1967), and Weekend (1967) - looking in particular at a factory, an inner-city flat/Maoist commune, … Continue reading Libidinal Circuits in 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her (1967) – Jean-Luc Godard.

Fear And Loathing In The Countryside – Withnail And I (1987).

British cinema is obsessed with the effect of location upon the individual.  In fact, it wouldn't be so sweeping to suggest that large swaths of culture born on these isles stems from the idea that the individual can be deeply molded by their surroundings and any fictional drama from Albion will be bare the aesthetics … Continue reading Fear And Loathing In The Countryside – Withnail And I (1987).