Georges Perec’s Les Lieux d’Une Fugue (1978)

When Georges Perec was 11, he decided to wander. In fact, escape is perhaps a better way of describing it; a jailbreak from his Aunt’s house in Rue de l’Assomption to wander Paris with who knows what planned other than avoiding school. It was such a defining experience for the writer that he later composed a text surrounding the feelings and places he encountered on … Continue reading Georges Perec’s Les Lieux d’Une Fugue (1978)

Gertrude Stein’s Rose and Chris Marker’s Owl

When recently reading Gertrude Stein’s famous poem Sacred Emily (1913), later published in Geography and Plays (1922) and famed for its sequence of “A rose is a rose is a rose…”, I was not thinking about a rose. Instead of a rose, I was in fact thinking of an owl. Before reading anything by Gertrude Stein, I had watched copious amounts of films by Chris … Continue reading Gertrude Stein’s Rose and Chris Marker’s Owl

The Temporal Disruptions of Marguerite Duras

Marguerite Duras was never keen to allow cinema an easy route out. Adapting her own stories into feature films, it seems that the writer, rather than compromise the ghostly qualities of her books, experimented and destabilised the narrative aspects of film form to suit her needs. Like her contemporary, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Duras made many attempts to transplant the elements of voice from her work into … Continue reading The Temporal Disruptions of Marguerite Duras

Phantom Coincidence in W.G. Sebald’s “Remembered Triptych…”

I was sat on a couch in Strasbourg reading essays by Teju Cole, the volume Known And Strange Things published quite recently by Faber and Faber. It was night and I was alone, glancing up occasionally, as I often do when in my partner’s flat, to stare at the city’s famous cathedral lit up at night. I was at the point of the book when Cole … Continue reading Phantom Coincidence in W.G. Sebald’s “Remembered Triptych…”

Memorial Dungeons: In Thomas Bernhard’s House

In 1965, Thomas Bernhard bought a house. It was bought roughly between the writing of several novellas, including Watten (1964), and his second novel, Gargoyles (1967). The house is not really house but a collection of farm houses known in German as Vierkanthof; a word that hints at a mockery typical of one of his characters. “Kant” sits in the middle just like the courtyard … Continue reading Memorial Dungeons: In Thomas Bernhard’s House

A Wander With Georges Perec

What can Georges Perec see out of the window? He’s sat as usual in Café de la Mairie, 8 place Saint-Sulpice in the 6th arrondissment, lodged at his single table by the window looking out. The Latin Quarter is passing by outside as always; it never really stops, merely lulls. On his small, plastic coated table, he has a pad and pencil bought from a … Continue reading A Wander With Georges Perec

Responses: Poems On Landscape And Melancholy (Volume 2)

Throughout 2017, I have continued with the responses form of article to works of art and other miscellanea.  Like last year, I found that a more interesting way to assess a piece of work was to not simply write an essay but to pair it with a poem; condensing the essence of the reading down into a basic selection of key notes, reactions and atmospheres.  … Continue reading Responses: Poems On Landscape And Melancholy (Volume 2)

2017 Review

Like last year, I have tried to keep up with enough new releases to eventually have something say at the end of the year.  And exactly like last year, I have virtually failed to see ten new releases that I’ve actually enjoyed.  I quietly accepted once again that, with some notable exceptions, new digital films are not especially for me and require a huge crossover … Continue reading 2017 Review