Blackwood (2013) – Adam Wimpenny.

The ghost story has had a resurgence lately in film and television.  Perhaps the increasing reliance on distancing technology and social media has lead to a desire to retread older forms that now seem prescient but there's no doubt that the genre as a whole is alive and well, especially for commercially minded lower budget … Continue reading Blackwood (2013) – Adam Wimpenny.

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The Masque of the Red Death, Roger Corman (Part 3) – The Freudian Dream.

Part 1. Part 2. The Freudian Dream Corman's Poe films have become famous for their dream sequences.  The source literature revels in the possibilities of nightmares taking over the psyche so they seem an apt distraction for a medium that already adores the possibilities of dreams.  The Masque of the Red Death perhaps contains Corman's … Continue reading The Masque of the Red Death, Roger Corman (Part 3) – The Freudian Dream.

The Masque of the Red Death (1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 2).

Part 1. The Levels of the Aesthetic Stage Through Castle Rooms and Colour. Corman's beautiful excess of colour in the film has already been mentioned but colour plays a vital role within the film's narrative too.  Its narrative focus however does not chime well with the Kierkegaard reading when considering the unevenness and ambiguity as … Continue reading The Masque of the Red Death (1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 2).

The Masque of the Red Death (Roger Corman, 1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 1).

Roger Corman may be better known for pulpy B-movies but his work adapting Edgar Allen Poe for the big screen is uncharacteristically layered and has a depth that far outstrips films of a far more serious ilk.  Almost all his Poe adaptations (excluding the fun but overall light The Raven) take Poe's original structure for … Continue reading The Masque of the Red Death (Roger Corman, 1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 1).

The Wicker Man (1973) – Defining Of The Folk Horror.

Its geography is stark, rugged and eerily inviting, its characters are sickly happy and lying through their teeth and its narrative is immersive and questioning to the point where its finale is deeply affecting and horrifying. It's a crying shame that viewers of The Wicker Man (1973) will never fully see the film as its … Continue reading The Wicker Man (1973) – Defining Of The Folk Horror.

The Old Dark House (1932) – Symbolism, Class and Taboo (James Whale).

Contains spoilers. Hindsight can be a terrible burden to approach an older film with; lagging hard on the back of the viewer whose inability to contextualise what they’re seeing disengages their perception.  When watching James Whale’s The Old Dark House (1932), it could be tempting to accuse the film of being full to the brim … Continue reading The Old Dark House (1932) – Symbolism, Class and Taboo (James Whale).

The Horror Film Score Rebellion Part 1 – Classic Horror

INTRODUCTION 1968 was the year that horror cinema sought to change the way in which it scored its films and began to develop alternatives to the increasingly cliched sounds that had become a staple of the genre since the silent era. David Raskin, who had scored the first two Basil Rathbone-starring Sherlock Holmes films in … Continue reading The Horror Film Score Rebellion Part 1 – Classic Horror

Night of the Demon – Jacques Tourneur (1957)

Jacques Tourneur is perhaps more famous these days for creating the atmosphere behind many of Val Lewton’s best psychological horrors but his work outside the stewardship of the creator of Cat People and I Walked with a Zombie is something of a rare treasure waiting to be uncovered.  His 1957 occult masterpiece Night of the … Continue reading Night of the Demon – Jacques Tourneur (1957)