The Aural Aesthetics of Ghosts in BBC Ghost Stories – Part 4 (Music).

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Nondiegetic Musical Themes And Textures. "Indeed, the celestial voices of film music do resemble a phantom in several significant ways.  They are ephemeral, they are not 'substantial' or do not constitute part of what audiences cognise as important in the film, and have an effect that is not apparent." … Continue reading The Aural Aesthetics of Ghosts in BBC Ghost Stories – Part 4 (Music).

Point Blank (John Boorman, 1967) – Rhythmic Footsteps and Diegetic Power.

What is the best way for a film to show the power of a character?  Is it to retain the power within the narrative world and show it be all encompassing, or is it better to show it to have control over specific qualities of the medium itself?  One of the best examples of this … Continue reading Point Blank (John Boorman, 1967) – Rhythmic Footsteps and Diegetic Power.

Analysis of Sound and Music in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – Part 3 (Acousmatic Concepts)

Part 1. Part 2. Emphasis on Acousmatic Concepts in Ross J. Fenimore's "Voices that Lie Within". "Psycho almost didn't happen.  This is a unique case of music literally saving a film." - Sullivan (2006, p.246). Like much literature around Psycho, Fenimore's "Voices That Lie Within" begins its argument with setting the scene. "Psycho begins with … Continue reading Analysis of Sound and Music in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – Part 3 (Acousmatic Concepts)

Deep End (1970) and the Musical Emphasising of Narrative (Jerzy Skolimowski).

This article contains spoilers. There are many aspects of distraction within Jerzy Skolimowski's 1970 film, Deep End.  Its highly sexualised, sometimes seedy narrative, its vast array of colours and its crisp, sharp direction are only a handful of its hyper-active eccentricities.  Even David Lynch, a long-time pessimist about colour cinema, is on record as a … Continue reading Deep End (1970) and the Musical Emphasising of Narrative (Jerzy Skolimowski).

Distant Voices, Still Lives (Part 3) – Music, Memory and Society.

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6. Music, Memory and Society. Adorno and Eisler argue that: “As a matter of principle, priority goes to the truly novel musical resources. However, motion-picture music can also summon other musical resources of the most varied nature, on the condition that it reaches the … Continue reading Distant Voices, Still Lives (Part 3) – Music, Memory and Society.

Distant Voices, Still Lives – Sounds of the Past. (Part 2)

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 The Sounds of the Past “To this inexorable, insidious awareness of your own dependence on your past, like an illness that grows even harder to bear, I gave the name “Nostalgia”...” (Tarkovsky, 1986, p.206) One of Distant Voices, Still Lives’ key differences to all that … Continue reading Distant Voices, Still Lives – Sounds of the Past. (Part 2)

The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner – Use of Music and Sound In British Working Class Film (Part 4).

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. The Metaphorical Use of Diegetic Sound and Music. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner has several different uses of sound; two of which aren’t musical.  The title perhaps gives a hint that the sound of running feet on a hard ground … Continue reading The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner – Use of Music and Sound In British Working Class Film (Part 4).

South Korean Film Scores and Ease of Consumption – Part 3 (Seopyeonje’s P’ansori and Soo-Chul Kim).

Part 1. Part 2. The Music of Soo-Chul Kim and the P'ansori aesthetic. Soo-Chul Kim is the composer of the nondiegetic score for Seopyeonje, though it is unclear how much influence he had on the other musical aspects of the film.  Looking at the film’s score, it can at first seem quite sparse once the … Continue reading South Korean Film Scores and Ease of Consumption – Part 3 (Seopyeonje’s P’ansori and Soo-Chul Kim).

South Korean Film Scores and Ease of Distribution – Part 2 (Im Kwon-Taek and Seopyeonje).

Part 1. Im Kwon-Taek – Reluctant Traditionalist or Radical Experimenter? “Despite its ideological shortcomings and male-centred stance, Im’s cinematic sublimation of ‘Korean-ness’ still focuses on the contradictions between tradition and modernity among precarious lives existing on the periphery of a capitalist society.” (Lee, 2005, p.69) It is somewhat difficult to gage the cultural impact of … Continue reading South Korean Film Scores and Ease of Distribution – Part 2 (Im Kwon-Taek and Seopyeonje).

Sound And Music In Cinema About The British Working Class (Part 1).

Propaganda, Metaphor And Nostalgia:  Sound And Music In Cinema About The British Working Class. Introduction – Class and the Arts “The collective function of music has become transformed into the function of ensnaring the customer.” (Adorno, 1947, p.61). Class is an ever pervasive issue in British society. While manifesting into many forms around the world, … Continue reading Sound And Music In Cinema About The British Working Class (Part 1).