Fernweh and The Green Ray (Éric Rohmer)

I have recently finished a draft of a novel which follows a lone woman who is mentally cast adrift by the news of her father’s suicide, her grief manifesting in a strange obsession with the town of Strasbourg where she opts to stay over the winter. In one of its sections, I have addressed the concept of Fernweh. The concept is unusual in that it … Continue reading Fernweh and The Green Ray (Éric Rohmer)

Avant Godard! – Part 2, Musical Subversion (Bande à Part and Pierrot Le Fou)

Part 1. Ideas In Later Films By Godard. Godard would continue to subvert the role of record players in his work to similar but more extreme effects. It seems odd that the connecting factor to all the scenes mentioned is the presence of his, then wife, Anna Karina.  Godard is capable of presenting her dancing and singing with a relatively normal relationship between the visual … Continue reading Avant Godard! – Part 2, Musical Subversion (Bande à Part and Pierrot Le Fou)

Avant Godard! Musical Subversion In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. (Part 1)

Avant Godard! Musical Subversion And Fictional Interaction With Non-Diegetic Music In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. Introduction – French New Wave As Avant Garde. When discussing Avant Garde cinema, the most obvious choices of cinematic subject would no doubt be linked to the likes of Dali, Buñuel and Cocteau.  However, the gradual movement from Avant Garde to Art House cinema presents a more interesting case for Avant Garde … Continue reading Avant Godard! Musical Subversion In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. (Part 1)

Pierrot Le Fou – Jean-Luc Godard (1965)

Describing Jean-Luc Godard’s output in the 1960s as prolific would be an understatement.  From his 1960 debut feature film A Bout De Souffle, he produced a wealth of experimental, groundbreaking and kitsch films often highlighting political stances and reveling in absurd visual eccentricities.  One of the many highlights from this creative storm is his one of his many crime films; 1965’s Pierrot Le Fou.  Though crime was … Continue reading Pierrot Le Fou – Jean-Luc Godard (1965)

Pickpocket – Robert Bresson (1959)

One of the more subtle directors to come from outside of the French New Wave pool, Robert Bresson is a director more concerned with issues and ideas than the visual experimentation that obsessed Godard or Truffaut.  His 1959 film, Pickpocket, also shies away from the overtly political side of Alan Resnais and instead adopts an approach of social comment, which instantly seems refreshing. Pickpocket follows the Crime and … Continue reading Pickpocket – Robert Bresson (1959)

Jules Et Jim At 50 – François Truffaut

This year sees the 50th anniversary of one of France’s best loved and most influential films; Jules et Jim.  François Truffaut is the ultimate poster boy of the French New Wave movement that climaxed at the end of the fifties and it is in these early films of his such asJules et Jim where genius is ever present for all to see.  Based on a book by Henri-Pierre … Continue reading Jules Et Jim At 50 – François Truffaut

Last Year In Marienbad – Alain Resnais (1961)

Alan Resnais is perhaps one of quieter directors of the French New Wave movement.  His films are often delicate examinations of the emotional states and philosophical choices that take their time in delivering a story.  Though less known than both Godard and Truffaut, his work has a strong consistency that makes repeat viewings essential in gaining an insight into what exactly the film was about.  Last Year … Continue reading Last Year In Marienbad – Alain Resnais (1961)