Isolation And Madness In Cul-De-Sac (1966) – Roman Polanski.

Few films are as explicit in their depiction of character relationships that are at the mercy of the fluctuating landscape than Roman Polanski's 1966 film, Cul-De-Sac.  Polanski had been to both ends of the environmental spectrum within his previous two films - the open waters of Knife In The Water (1962) and the cramped, claustrophobic … Continue reading Isolation And Madness In Cul-De-Sac (1966) – Roman Polanski.

The Forests Of Ivan’s Childhood (1962) – Andrei Tarkovsky.

For a film about war, Ivan's Childhood (1962) by Andrei Tarkovsky dwells quite unexpectedly upon the natural landscape of its narrative.  At first, this might seem somewhat unsurprising; after all, most films set during war often make use of the battered terrain of the landscape, if only to show the fallout and power of the … Continue reading The Forests Of Ivan’s Childhood (1962) – Andrei Tarkovsky.

A Musicological Study of Ken Russell’s Composer Films – Part 9 (Conclusions).

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6. Part 7. Part 8. Conclusions. The auteristic traits of any director can have a strong, almost unstoppable effect on a film and its subject matter.  This often ranges from stylistic visual aestheticism to more thematic trends in a director's body of work.  For … Continue reading A Musicological Study of Ken Russell’s Composer Films – Part 9 (Conclusions).

The Unleashing of Repressed Eroticism in Black Narcissus (1947) and The Shining (1980).

The geographical make-up of a film's scenario is often a subtle root-cause of its dramatic effect.  The sense of place, both its physical and psychological attributes, can be so overwhelming that whole narratives can follow the buckling of characters under pressure from this force; to the point where their own emotional identity and personal dynamics … Continue reading The Unleashing of Repressed Eroticism in Black Narcissus (1947) and The Shining (1980).

The Uncanny in Häxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages (1922)- Benjamin Christensen.

In one of the first attempts I made at canonising the sub-genre of Folk Horror, I likened the majority of its films to be brilliant but mere fugues on the ideas presented in Benjamin Christensen's Häxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages (1922).  Outside of Victor Sjöström's The Phantom Carriage (1921), it was the earliest and most … Continue reading The Uncanny in Häxan: Witchcraft Through The Ages (1922)- Benjamin Christensen.

Sounds of the City – Defining the Metropolis in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954).

In spite of being set in the most cramped of city-based fictional areas, Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window (1954) successfully presents the bustling aesthetics of a whole metropolis while managing to retain an almost claustrophobic isolation.  In the film, Hitchcock presents a temporarily wheelchair-bound photographer who becomes obsessed with a neighbour. He suspects the unusual man … Continue reading Sounds of the City – Defining the Metropolis in Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window (1954).

The Music of Folk Horror – Part 2 (Folk Horror Chain and Witchfinder General).

Part 1. Thematic Material of the Folk Horror Chain. "Grendel was the name of this grim demon, haunting the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolate fens; he had dwelt for a time in misery among the banished monsters, Cain's clan, whom the creator had outlawed and condemned as outcasts." (Heaney, p.6, 1999). Though … Continue reading The Music of Folk Horror – Part 2 (Folk Horror Chain and Witchfinder General).

Bastards (Claire Denis, 2014) – Oily Depths and Blank Walls.

Terrible things can happen in environments that allow people to step-back from consequences; this is the first step in most types of crime and film noir pictures.  But to simply place Claire Denis' latest film, Bastards (2014), into one of these categories just for the ease of categorisation does it little justice.  Denis' film has … Continue reading Bastards (Claire Denis, 2014) – Oily Depths and Blank Walls.

L’Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960) – A Curious Distance.

For a film that, on the surface, appears to be held in such high regard, Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Avventura (1960) seems to have distanced itself from a number of its audience.  While I often wish to adhere to the third person in criticism, this article cannot help but revert to a personal reception of the film … Continue reading L’Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960) – A Curious Distance.

The Seventh Continent (Michael Haneke) and the Freudian Death Drive – Part 1.

Introduction Michael Haneke's debut feature set the tone for the majority of his interests that would be explored over the next few decades.  The Seventh Continent (1989), though part of the Glaciation Trilogy, stands on its own for questioning a very specific and brutal form of philosophy; that of Freud's Death Drive principles.  Though Haneke would … Continue reading The Seventh Continent (Michael Haneke) and the Freudian Death Drive – Part 1.