Interview: Mike Hodges on Get Carter (1971).

Mike Hodges’ debut feature film, Get Carter (1971), was one of the key shifts in British cinema of the period.  With its total lack of hope, an earnest presence of violence and a hugely detailed topography, the film is one of the definitive shifts to the more gritty, unremitting cinema produced in the early Heath years alongside the likes of Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange … Continue reading Interview: Mike Hodges on Get Carter (1971).

For Those In Peril (Paul Wright, 2013) – The Reality of Lore.

Alone, alone, all, all alone, Alone on a wide wide sea! And never a saint took pity on My soul in agony. He despiseth the creatures of the calm, The many men, so beautiful! And they all dead did lie: And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I. – Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Paul Wright’s debut … Continue reading For Those In Peril (Paul Wright, 2013) – The Reality of Lore.

The Use of Sound and Music in Film About the British Working Class – Conclusions (Part 9).

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6. Part 7. Part 8. Conclusions The aim of this assessment of music in film about the British working class was initially construed to highlight which of the uses discussed was the most critically honest. The obvious chronological order of the films was originally intended to show a positive growth in quality and a … Continue reading The Use of Sound and Music in Film About the British Working Class – Conclusions (Part 9).

Winstanley (Kevin Brownlow and Andrew Mollo) – Landscape Politics and Folk Aesthetics.

Though more famous and widely recognised for film restoration and archiving (for which he received an Academy Award for) Kevin Brownlow’s second shared feature film with Andrew Mollo, Winstanley (1975), is a masterpiece of traditional, historic cinema.  It not only captures the feel of the era that produced an amalgamation of tradition-based horror cinema but showed that, through using a number of classical cinematic techniques, … Continue reading Winstanley (Kevin Brownlow and Andrew Mollo) – Landscape Politics and Folk Aesthetics.

Screen-Next-The-Sea Film Festival – Kevin Brownlow Lecture.

While journeying down for a short trip away to the secluded vistas of the Norfolk broads, little was I aware that the weekend away was to allow for a lecture and a personal chat with one of this writer’s heroes.  The brilliant thing about north Norfolk in general is that, in just about every field whether it be art, film or even food, it has … Continue reading Screen-Next-The-Sea Film Festival – Kevin Brownlow Lecture.

The Lady Vanishes – Alfred Hitchcock (1938)

When watching the first half an hour of The Lady Vanishes, it may perhaps be surprising that nothing whatsoever to do with a lady vanishing graces the screen.  This however allows the film to throw many a surprise over the viewer in the typical Hitchcock manner. The film opens in the disgruntled happenings of a hotel, somewhere around Switzerland.  Instead of concentrating on the main … Continue reading The Lady Vanishes – Alfred Hitchcock (1938)

The 39 Steps – Alfred Hitchcock (1935)

The wrong man scenario is one that Alfred Hitchcock not only seemed to be obsessed with, but one that he made his own.  When choosing the best of his “wrong man”, there’s no doubt that his 1935 adaptation of John Buchan’s The 39 Steps would at least reside near that top.  The apparent master of suspense is firing here on all cylinders, creating ideas and … Continue reading The 39 Steps – Alfred Hitchcock (1935)

If… – Lindsay Anderson (1968)

That natural progression from film critic to filmmaker seems to be a route rarely traversed these days.  The natural opposite of this is often a more comfortable way to explore both the medium and the craft, with many filmmakers writing books specifically after they’ve established a film career.  Along with renowned critic and filmmaker, Francois Truffaut, director and critic Lindsay Anderson is one of the … Continue reading If… – Lindsay Anderson (1968)

Get Carter – Mike Hodges (1971)

Michael Caine has had many a fine role in his long and incredibly varied career spanning over five decades.  Considering his best film role will often bring up the usual favourites.  Many people will perhaps cite The Italian Job, Zulu and The Ipcress Files as his best work while just as many try to forget about his role in Jaws 4.  However there is one role that stands out truly as … Continue reading Get Carter – Mike Hodges (1971)

The Third Man – Carol Reed (1949)

Film-Noir is a genre so confidently dominated by Hollywood that it takes a film of monumental brilliance to find success in the genre when made outside the valleys of oranges and glamour.  France has Henri-Georges Clouzout’s Les Diaboliques, Germany has Fritz Lang’s M but here in the U.K. we have a Film-Noir that stands higher in the polls than all of the American efforts to grace the genre … Continue reading The Third Man – Carol Reed (1949)