Collapsing Belief Systems and The Nietzschean Death – (Winter Light, The White Ribbon, The Turin Horse).

One of Friedrich Nietzsche’s more famous and strangely popular idioms is his “Death of God” theory presented through the madman in his 1883 work The Gay Science.  Though it has been used for all sorts of philosophical and theological purpose, often twisting it to fit whatever schematics the debater wants to shape it into, the idea itself can apply to several pieces of cinema, all … Continue reading Collapsing Belief Systems and The Nietzschean Death – (Winter Light, The White Ribbon, The Turin Horse).

Avant Godard! – Part 2, Musical Subversion (Bande à Part and Pierrot Le Fou)

Part 1. Ideas In Later Films By Godard. Godard would continue to subvert the role of record players in his work to similar but more extreme effects. It seems odd that the connecting factor to all the scenes mentioned is the presence of his, then wife, Anna Karina.  Godard is capable of presenting her dancing and singing with a relatively normal relationship between the visual … Continue reading Avant Godard! – Part 2, Musical Subversion (Bande à Part and Pierrot Le Fou)

Kanal – Andrzej Wajda (1957).

It’s the last few days of the Warsaw uprising and the resistance of the third platoon is down to its last few men and women; made up of a motley bunch of different fighters all with a common cause of disrupting the Nazi occupiers at any cost.  Reading this short summation, it’s very easy to imagine Andrzej Wajda’s 1957 film Kanal, as some sort of boys-own romp … Continue reading Kanal – Andrzej Wajda (1957).

Avant Godard! Musical Subversion In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. (Part 1)

Avant Godard! Musical Subversion And Fictional Interaction With Non-Diegetic Music In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. Introduction – French New Wave As Avant Garde. When discussing Avant Garde cinema, the most obvious choices of cinematic subject would no doubt be linked to the likes of Dali, Buñuel and Cocteau.  However, the gradual movement from Avant Garde to Art House cinema presents a more interesting case for Avant Garde … Continue reading Avant Godard! Musical Subversion In The Films Of Jean-Luc Godard. (Part 1)

Summer Interlude – Ingmar Bergman (1951)

The slow and gradual death of a number of emotional pillars is a key theme to a much of Ingmar Bergman’s earlier work.  Though the death of religion dominates his work fromThe Seventh Seal onwards, the physical death through aging and the passing of time that causes this, is something reserved to his earlier work.  However the final conclusion of this act is almost never presented.  … Continue reading Summer Interlude – Ingmar Bergman (1951)

My Neighbour Totoro – Hayao Miyazaki (1988)

No other film produced by the Studio Ghibli animation company has come to define the studio in its creative aims and ideals more than its 1988 film My Neighbour Totoro directed by Hayao Miyazaki.  Not only is the company now represented by the images of the creatures found in the film, it is the perfect blend of naive idealism and alternative animation with the depth and … Continue reading My Neighbour Totoro – Hayao Miyazaki (1988)

La Strada – Federico Fellini (1954)

Federico Fellini is one of Italy’s greatest and most influential filmmaker with a style and substance rarely matched in European art house film, especially in earlier work.  A number of his pictures have recently made it into the Sight & Sound top 100 poll with his masterpiece 8 ½ even finishing within the top 10.  He’s a director who often portrays the struggles of humanity in the … Continue reading La Strada – Federico Fellini (1954)

Shoot the Pianist – Francois Truffaut (1960)

At the heart of many films by François Truffaut, there is a flawed but humble and tragic male figure that often gets into trouble or worse, has his heart broken.  There’s no doubt that Truffaut, himself a gentle and misunderstood director, projects himself into his many flawed men of his films, whether it’s troubled youth Antoine Doinel from The 400 Blows or women addicted Bertrand Morane from The … Continue reading Shoot the Pianist – Francois Truffaut (1960)

Yojimbo – Akira Kurosawa (1961)

When talking about Japanese cinema, the era of its golden age dominates most discourse on the subject. Writers often discuss “the big three”- the three defining directors of the era that put Japan on the cinematic map as well as influence a large amount of creative’s outside of Japan. Yasujirō Ozu and Kenji Mizoguchi are both experts in maverick filmmaking but approaching this canon of … Continue reading Yojimbo – Akira Kurosawa (1961)

Film Scores and the Social Construction of Emotions (Kurosawa and Ozu) – Part 1.

As a race of individual people, trying to find out where our characteristics came from can be a difficult task.  More specifically, trying to deduce whether we gained emotional characteristics on our own or whether they were influenced by outside factors (also meaning that these outside factors have in fact been effected by our emotions and not the other way round) is an almost impossible … Continue reading Film Scores and the Social Construction of Emotions (Kurosawa and Ozu) – Part 1.