L’Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960) – A Curious Distance.

For a film that, on the surface, appears to be held in such high regard, Michelangelo Antonioni's L'Avventura (1960) seems to have distanced itself from a number of its audience.  While I often wish to adhere to the third person in criticism, this article cannot help but revert to a personal reception of the film … Continue reading L’Avventura (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1960) – A Curious Distance.

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Maîtresse – Barbet Schroeder (1976), BFI.

This review contains spoilers. Barbet Schroeder’s Maîtresse (1976) is a film that is extremely hard to classify.  Even with the hindsight of almost forty years, its apparent bed fellows all share a stubborn resistance to classification.  The collection of films with vaguely similar themes and tendencies to push boundaries of explicitness that came out in … Continue reading Maîtresse – Barbet Schroeder (1976), BFI.

Vampyr – Carl T. Dreyer (1932)

Carl Theodor Dreyer is one of the more gentle directors to rise from the Scandinavian art house and a man who’s work in general showcases a sensuality and delicate touch that would leave many of his contemporaries completely enamoured.  With the exception of his often-praised emotional tour de force La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc, Vampyrcomfortably stands as the … Continue reading Vampyr – Carl T. Dreyer (1932)

Three Colours Trilogy – Krzysztof Kieslowski (1993)

One of the many highlights of the 90’s reassertion of realism; The Three Colours Trilogy, by director Krzysztof Kieslowski, can be seen as one of the high bench marks of film before the digital age.  It’s hard to imagine a successful set of mainstream films being so metaphorical and altogether emotionally deep getting so far in … Continue reading Three Colours Trilogy – Krzysztof Kieslowski (1993)