Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari (1920) – Masters of Cinema Restoration.

Shadows dance upon the walls of Robert Wiene's Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari (1920).  The world of shadows and light, edges and angles, the slanted and the macabre, all seem so much more at home in silent cinema as a whole; images that negate sound have a very natural ghostliness to their nature.  This is … Continue reading Das Cabinet Des Dr. Caligari (1920) – Masters of Cinema Restoration.

Kevin Brownlow Discusses Abel Gance’s Napoléon.

Said to be a labour of love lasting over forty years, the restoration of Abel Gance's Napoléon by filmmaker, restorer and archivist Kevin Brownlow, has gone down in the annuls of film history. With the latest restoration having been successfully screen and rapturously received at the San Francisco silent film festival, this November sees a … Continue reading Kevin Brownlow Discusses Abel Gance’s Napoléon.

Train to Train – Early Rhythms of Silent Film (Lumière and Keaton)

During the first quarter of film history, film language very quickly cemented itself into forms that would stay that way in mainstream cinema until the middle of the 20th century. Looking back at the surviving imagery of the first era of film (i.e. the silent era), it’s easy to see how these forms quickly solidified … Continue reading Train to Train – Early Rhythms of Silent Film (Lumière and Keaton)

The Persistence of Modernity in Japanese Film Scores – Part 1 (Ozu, Tradition and Silent Film)

The Persistence of Modernity in Japanese Film Scores. Introduction The scores and music produced for Japanese cinema highlight a constant change of values within the country; a relationship rarely mirrored so accurately in the cinema of anywhere else.  Whereas the film scores of other countries can be looked at as a product of the trends … Continue reading The Persistence of Modernity in Japanese Film Scores – Part 1 (Ozu, Tradition and Silent Film)

Nosferatu – A Comparison. (F.W Murnau, Werner Herzog)

Article originally published on http://www.ACEliverpool.com There’s something wonderfully timeless about early vampire films. No matter how aged the visuals of screen adaptations look, the bare bones of the narrative make them compelling and often affecting slices of drama. Even the word Nosferatu drips with gothic headiness and its jagged inflections speak of something dark, morbid … Continue reading Nosferatu – A Comparison. (F.W Murnau, Werner Herzog)