Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 5 (Post-Modern Pulp).

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Though of course subjective, the natural Kierkegaardian immediacy of the music is instantly on show.  Several sections of brooding along these themes can be read almost as seductions, with the build-ups working easily as well as the seduction segments from The Miraculous Mandarin.  The pairs of strings … Continue reading Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 5 (Post-Modern Pulp).

Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 4 (Kierkegaard’s Immediacy)

Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Kierkegaard's Erotic Immediacy and the Atonal Manifestation of Complex Erotic Identity in Music for Strings, Percussion and Celesta. "Sensuous immediacy has its absolute medium in music, and this also explains why music in the ancient world did not become properly developed but is linked to the Christian world." - … Continue reading Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 4 (Kierkegaard’s Immediacy)

Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 3 (The Modernist Jungle)

Part 1. Part 2. On the other hand, The Miraculous Mandarin presents a set of characters who are, by contrast, in the aesthetic stage; satisfied with the quick, disposable type of pleasures and unconcerned with future development.  Carlisle states that " The aesthetic mode of existence is characterized by the pursuit of personal satisfaction.  The … Continue reading Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók – Part 3 (The Modernist Jungle)

Eroticism In The Music Of Béla Bartók – Part 1 (Introduction).

The Insertion and Removal Through Post-Wagnerian Ideals and New Media of Eroticism in the Music of Béla Bartók. Introduction. The music of Béla Bartók sits with some uncertainty between the last dying cries of Romanticism and the encroaching presence of Modernism.  With this clash of ideals producing the composer's early work, Bartók's music appears to … Continue reading Eroticism In The Music Of Béla Bartók – Part 1 (Introduction).

The Masque of the Red Death (1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 2).

Part 1. The Levels of the Aesthetic Stage Through Castle Rooms and Colour. Corman's beautiful excess of colour in the film has already been mentioned but colour plays a vital role within the film's narrative too.  Its narrative focus however does not chime well with the Kierkegaard reading when considering the unevenness and ambiguity as … Continue reading The Masque of the Red Death (1964) – Kierkegaard’s Aesthetic Phase and Inverted Freudian Pleasure Principle (Part 2).