The Horror Score Rebellion Part 2 – Night Of The Living Dead And The Electronic Score.

Horror films were slow on the upkeep when it came to electronic music. Though elements of it were being used in other genres before 1968, electronic music didn’t really reach horror until the late sixties. The exact date of the first use of electronic score has been attributed to various films; largely Cold War fare such as The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951) and Invasion of the … Continue reading The Horror Score Rebellion Part 2 – Night Of The Living Dead And The Electronic Score.

The Mummy – Terence Fisher (1959)

Having hit gold with their adaptations of Universal classic horrors Frankenstein (Curse of Frankenstein, 1957) and Dracula (Horror of Dracula, 1958), Hammer delved further into the back catalogue of monsters and villains in its 1959 production, The Mummy.  Unlike the previous two adaptations, this one seems relatively similar to its Universal predecessor in tone and feel, making it feel like a necessity for the company … Continue reading The Mummy – Terence Fisher (1959)

My Neighbour Totoro – Hayao Miyazaki (1988)

No other film produced by the Studio Ghibli animation company has come to define the studio in its creative aims and ideals more than its 1988 film My Neighbour Totoro directed by Hayao Miyazaki.  Not only is the company now represented by the images of the creatures found in the film, it is the perfect blend of naive idealism and alternative animation with the depth and … Continue reading My Neighbour Totoro – Hayao Miyazaki (1988)

La Strada – Federico Fellini (1954)

Federico Fellini is one of Italy’s greatest and most influential filmmaker with a style and substance rarely matched in European art house film, especially in earlier work.  A number of his pictures have recently made it into the Sight & Sound top 100 poll with his masterpiece 8 ½ even finishing within the top 10.  He’s a director who often portrays the struggles of humanity in the … Continue reading La Strada – Federico Fellini (1954)

Dracula: Prince of Darkness – Terence Fisher (1966)

Having taken a break for the sequel to 1958’s Dracula, the Count returned to Hammer after having left all the hard work to Baron Meinster in 1960’s Brides of Dracula.  1966’s Dracula Prince of Darkness is missing only one element that would allow it to become the strongest in Hammer’s canon.  Christopher Lee returns as the count but sadly missing from the film is Peter … Continue reading Dracula: Prince of Darkness – Terence Fisher (1966)